Status check


#101

The airport in town is now being used as a staging area for fire-fighting helicopters. It’s the nearest airport to the fires.


#102

Today should be sunny. That is not fog. That is not a cloudy sky. That is smoke.


#103

More evacuations this morning. None too close to my home, but not out of danger yet. :crossed_fingers:


#104

I got up this morning and read that things have gotten even worse with more fires starting in between two others.
Given that your last post was 9 hours ago I really hope you are okay.
I also hope that if you do get evacuated you don’t stop to update us, but just get the hell out.


#105

I’m still okay. Things look like they’re improving, but we’re still under red flag conditions until this evening.


#106

No new evacuations during the night. :relieved:


#107


#108

The fires did not spread significantly last night. Containment numbers are rising, anywhere from 25-60% depending on the fire. I think my town is safe, though there are quite a few areas that are still in danger.

The best news? My work is no longer in an evacuation area, and some people may be allowed to return home today.


#109

The fires in my area are 25-60% contained now. The awful statistics are:

  • 102,000 people displaced
  • 22 confirmed deaths in Sonoma county alone, but that is expected to rise as the search and rescue personnel are able to get into areas where the fire has passed. The sad thing is, the deaths so far have almost all been people over 70 who couldn’t flee.
  • Almost 4000 buildings (homes and businesses) destroyed
  • 50,000 people were without power, though that number is down to about 17,000 now.

Tomorrow I get to go back to work. The college is due to re-open on Tuesday.

:cry:


#110

The picture of a mail truck doing its rounds on a neighborhood that was totally flattened really got to me.

Stupid question, but what is the protocol for this? I guess the mail carrier looks for anyone working on their homes, but if the mailboxes are gone, do they hold mail by default? Seems like the humanitarian thing to do, but government polices are often less clear.


#111

Mail carriers are not going into any of the mandatory evacuation areas. Mail is being collected and held for pickup at several locations in the county. Picture ID is required to pick up mail.


#112

We lost our first firefighter today. :cry:


#113

Looks like the fires moved back towards Santa Rosa last night. No new evacuations, though, and a lot of the standing evacuations have been lifted. Classes at my college start up again today.


#114

Might sound like a dumb question, but what is standard evacuation procedure over there? I keep hearing these awful stories, like the man and his wife who took shelter in a swimming pool, because they couldn’t evacuate. Shouldn’t there be someone - even just neighbourhood watch, or sheriff’s deputies - going door to door and making sure people are aware and prepared as soon as the evacuation order goes out?


#115

In Indiana you hear the tornado siren and go to the basement and grab your ankles.


#116

There were people going from door to door pounding on them and getting people out. The problem was, it was in the middle of the night and the fire moved so fast that they couldn’t get to everyone. I saw body cam footage from one of the deputies trying to get people out, and the flames were huge and moved so fast.

Edit: Here’s a short clip.
Ah. Here is the video I was looking for. http://www.ktvu.com/news/sonoma-county-sheriff-releases-body-camera-video-from-deadly-fires


#117

In California the ground starts to shake with no warning and you take a second to decide if it’s serious enough to dive under a table or desk. If it is, you do so and then curl up into a ball and ride it out.


#118

All of the fires in the area are over 90% contained now! A couple of them are at 98% containment. :tada:

Edited to correct typos.


#119

You watch Ranma1/2!! Old show. I love it.


#120

Some of us have even been known to write Ranma 1/2 fanfiction.