Printer issue


#21

Definitely chicken. Deep fried and breaded.


#22

It’s definitely an network issue. It works at one site but not another so that tells me one network is fine and the other is not. My question is, which NIC is the printer using? That printer has a hard NIC and wireless connectivity. It used to be that if you plugged a cable into a printer, the wireless was disabled but that’s not the case anymore. My guess is it’s connecting to a wireless network and it’s either breaking or working depending on the location. If it’s hard wired, disable the wireless. It’s a security hazard in an event plus it will clear up the troubleshooting by ruling it out.


#23

Another printerer singing its triumphant song :slight_smile:

Good, let the n00bs scratch their noggins. Based on this thread I now know what to do with the bastard printerer.

Hammer.


#24

Yeah the Local team passed it to network and are having them look into it.


#25

This.

I’ve seen many a weird network issue resolved by turning off WLAN.


#26

I bet they’ll also be scratching their noggins…

Until somebody turns off WLAN (as per the above).


#27


#28

PC LOAD LETTER? What the F**K does that mean?


#29

It means your printerer haz A4 paperer in its stomach, and somebody sent a printerer job on a Letter sheet to said printerer.

Some will stop and refuse to go further, others will show that message and others will printerer.

Others will lead you on a merry-go-round chase just to purge the print job and continue (konica minolta printerers)


#30

That cracked me up first time I’ve seen it :joy:


#31

Wait, Letter is still an actually-used standard? Where?


#32

Ask the printerer driverer programmers - most of these default to LETTER for some reason.


#33

But we have so many normal, standard standard paper sizes! Why use something that died around the same time as typewriters…

…oh wait yes. It’s a standard. It must be obfuscated as much as possible to promote… I dunno, free market paper or some crap.


#34

Letter sized paper is used by the same nation that launched a car into space.


#35

Everywhere in the USA. I have to explain to my class every mod what A4 is.


#36

BOOYA!!!

The Discourse AI doesn’t like my reply…


#37

Can’t you guys just join ISO like the rest of the world? It wouldn’t be hard, the infrastructure is already here, as are the standards, as are the things that you like but are produced elsewhere to normal standards… :stuck_out_tongue:


#38

But… Change is hard! :stuck_out_tongue:


#39

Nope, nope, nope. Y’all still refer to people’s weight in “stone”, so thanks, I’ll just be sticking to feet and inches. Literally last night, I was watching a show from over there where stone was used. (Hulu says it is a Hulu Original Series, but I call BS - it totally looks like a BBC production and Google says Network: Sky One)
Plus, I don’t like A4 paper; too used to letter size. If I remember correctly from my copier tech days, Japanese paper sizes are slightly different than Euro standards. So globally, there are a number of standards to choose from.


#40

Correction, people who were adults in the 1980s say stone.

I’m 95kg and don’t have a sodding clue how many fractions of seventy two I have to divide the square root of cucumber I’d have to pass that through to make into stone. I’m only half sure if it’s even sixteen pounds to a stone or whether it’s fourteen just to be rubbish.

The only reason we still use miles on our roadsigns is because it’d cost almost £650m to change them all, based on how much it cost Ireland to switch in 1998.

Sky One are… well for starters, they’re one of the few channels you have to pay for here. And it still has adverts. They also cater to the “middle English” which is a polite term for Daily Mail readers, the same bunch of people who fought back against decimalisation so hard that they tried to get the term kilogram banned in Britain. Obviously, they lost, and we use metric for everything that isn’t roadsigns now.

…well, actually that’s just on the mainland too. All the little islands around our edges are metric, and most of our warning signs also have metric on too.