Buying a new car?


#101

The county I’m in does mandate a small amount of ethanol, which may disagree with some vehicles (mostly older ones). A friend had a weird Chinese motorcycle that had been rebuilt with some components that melted due to the ethanol content.


#102

E10 everywhere in New York, all the time. It gummed up my snowblower a couple winters ago - small engines do not like Ethanol.

I buy my small engine gas down at the marina now, Ethanol-free, but it’s 93 octane and the engines don’t love that either (they want 87). It’s a 45 minute round trip to get 87 that’s Ethanol-free AFAIK.


#103

We only have 93, 95 and hi-octane here in ZA. And diesel.

My Rolla will happily run on any grade fuel, as long as it is 93 and it can be either leaded or lead-free.

Haven’t seen 87-grade since y2k happened. Surprised that you can still get it in the US of A

Not sure whether ethanol-based fuels will be introduced here, but I think a lot of the local taxis will hate it :smile:


#104

93 is high-octane here. I don’t see anything higher. Unless there’s some weird metric/Imperial oddity and the rating system is different.

My current ride is a Mini and it’s good on gas… But I have to put expensive stuff in. I think the manual recommends 91 or greater, so 93 is my usual.


#105

@Ook, 87 is the standard here in the USA. It’s what I put in my car. Some higher end vehicles want 91. We also have 89.


#106

America and the “rest of the world” use different octane ratings that are almost-but-not-quite compatible. America has “MON” - Motor Octane Number and everyone uses “RON” - Relative(?) Octane Number.

I don’t know what the conversion factor between MON and RON is, sadly.


#107

I’m guessing it involved some sort of “MO-RON” conversion.


#108

[Golf clap]

Very well done, sir!